Basic Mountaineering Course experience

As I’m writing this piece, I’m trying to figure out the beginning of this. Getting a seat in Basic Mountaineering Course in any of the Institutes in India is itself a daunting task. They get full; well not just months but an year in advance. I applied in HMI (Himalayan Mountaineering Institute), Darjeeling in November 2016. I got a seat in women only batch of May 2017.

We were more than 60 women in the batch. We belonged to different parts of India and came from different walks of life. We also had one Japanese and one German lady among us. We had three women from Indian army and one from Indian Air Force too. The age group varied from teenagers to 40 years old.

The first morning in HMI, I woke up at 5 by the hustle outside our room. I came out to find girls staring in awe at the mountains far off. From HMI hostel, we could see the mighty Kanchanjunga range .

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Kanchanjunga range seen from HMI, Darjeeling.

After the P.T. on first day, we were divided into 9 different teams/ropes. After all, mountaineering is a team sport. Each team had 6-8 members. Each member led the team for 3 days in the course.

The course was divided into two phases: training in HMI, Darjeeling and training in HMI Base Camp, Sikkim.

During the time in Darjeeling, we had 5 km run every morning followed by P.T. exercises or yoga. Rest of the day was a mix of theory classes and practicals. We learnt knots. We learnt natural rock climbing and rappelling on Tenzing rock. We also had artificial rock climbing practice on indoor and outdoor walls. We received all the mountaineering equipments. After a week, we had our practice trek to Tiger Hill. It was 12 km one way. If clear weather, one can see Sikkim Himalayas, Nepal Himalayas and Bhutan Himalayas all together from Tiger Hill.

One day after Tiger Hill trek, we left for HMI Base camp. We moved to Yaksum, Sikkim by cars. From Yaksum, we began our trek to base camp. First day we entered Kanchanjunga National Park and trekked 14 km to Tshoka. We stayed one day in Tshoka for acclimatisation. From Tshoka we moved to Zongri. That day it rained like cats and dogs. We trekked the 11 km distance completely drenched in rain. Next day it continued raining. We trekked 13 km from Zongri to reach the base camp.

Base camp was a beautiful place. But the idea of spending 10 days in complete isolation with 50 people living in a single hut was something for each one of us. We acclimatised for one day. Then our glacier training began on alternate days. We used to trek two hours one way to reach Rathong glacier. We had ice climbing, rappelling, jumaring, crevasse rescue and anchor base training on glacier. Last day, we had our ice climbing test. Meanwhile, we had our theory lessons in base camp. After glacier training, we had one day of height gain. B C Roy peak of height 17,000 ft was chosen for us. It was a clear day. We started around 6 in the morning from base camp. But as it happens with mountain weather, it turned really bad during the climb. Five of us reached closest to the top. But 150 m away from the summit, we had to turn back due to worsening weather. It was overwhelming to experience what an expedition feels like. One day post the height gain, we left base camp. While returning, we covered the distance from Base camp to Yaksum in 2 days only.

On reaching Darjeeling, we had our graduation on the auspicious date of 29th may, the day Tenzing Norgay conquered Mt Everest and also the birth anniversary of Tenzing Norgay.

Twenty-eight days were amazing learning experience. I got more than I expected, be it the technical knowledge of mountaineering or experience of mountains. But the most amazing part of the journey were the people I met.

Love got a new meaning when I met the young lady who is working hard to save money to get married in Everest Base Camp to the love of her life, a mountaineer.

The army officer, 3 months into her marriage, taught me about leadership and giving your 100% in everything you do.

I have heard people complaining about how they are too old for things. Well, a 29 year old lady, quitting her government job of 7 years, just proved it’s never too late for anything.

I met someone who in spite of being selected for Masters program from London School of Economics, is crazy for Young India Fellowship. πŸ˜€

It’s said that mountaineering is like the mother of all sports because in mountains there is no second chance. You make one small mistake and it costs you something. But we are humans and we all make mistakes. I met someone who learned the lesson hard way. He climbed Everest but lost his two fingers due to frost bite because of not being able to see little snow inside his gloves.

I met Sirs who reminded us not to consider ourselves girls but humans first.

I learned there is so much scope to be better than who I was yesterday.

I hope mountains call me again, may be for advanced course. It’s time​ for home now. πŸ˜€

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Mountains of Darjeeling covered by clouds πŸ™‚

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